Review: Robert Plant crosses continents on album

first_imgRobert Plant, “lullaby and… The Ceaseless Roar” (Nonesuch)There are the Robert Plant fans firmly in the why-doesn’t-he-just-tour-with-Led Zeppelin camp. Then there are those who admire the former rock god’s post-Zep reign as a restless experimenter and global troubadour with little use for nostalgia.The latter group will find much to appreciate on the stirring, often melancholic and thoroughly modern “lullaby and… The Ceaseless Roar.” It’s the first studio album with his versatile recent touring outfit, the Sensational Space Shifters. With players from various continents and musical traditions, the band follows effortlessly as Plant leads the charge over the common ground connecting American country and blues, English folk, African rhythm, riff-heavy rock and even electronica.The opener, “Little Maggie,” is a reinvention of a traditional Appalachian number popularized in the 1940s by the bluegrass duo the Stanley Brothers. This time that twang isn’t a banjo, rather a one-stringed Gambian instrument called the ritti. The song ends with a surprising but smooth transition to a trip-hop style electro beat. The heaviest track, “Turn It Up,” features Tom Waits-style junkyard percussion and some distorted electric guitar workouts. “House of Love” — a warm ballad with a slow, booming rhythm — surveys “the damage done” following a shattered relationship.Good luck getting that tune’s bittersweet melody out of your head. The album throbs with ambition and subtlety and rewards replays. Who needs nostalgia?last_img read more

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‘Star Trek Beyond’ premieres at Comic-Con

first_imgSAN DIEGO | The world premiere of “Star Trek Beyond” blasted off at Comic-Con with an orchestra, fireworks, lasers and tributes to the series’ late stars.The sci-fi sequel premiered Wednesday night to more than 3,500 attendees at a flashy invite-only event held at San Diego’s Embarcadero Marina Park just outside the site of the four-day pop-culture convention.Chris Pine, Zoe Saldana, Karl Urban and other “Trek” stars introduced the film on stage before the San Diego Symphony performed selections from the score amid a flurry of fireworks and lasers. “I can’t imagine a better place to premiere it than here at Comic-Con,” said Quinto while on the red carpet beforehand. “I thought it was going to be mayhem, but there is such a beautiful hush here.”The 90-piece orchestra accompanied the film as it was projected on the first-ever outdoor Imax screen. The mammoth screen was erected especially for the event.“Oh my God,” said Urban on the red carpet. “It’s like the largest screen on the planet for the ‘Star Trek Beyond’ premiere. I’m so excited.”The crowd erupted with laughter and cheers at various moments during the threequel, including when Pine’s starship boss James T. Kirk pulls off a daring escape on a motorcycle and as John Cho’s helmsman Hikaru Sulu embraces his never-before-seen husband and daughter.“It’s fun when you get to come here and show off a film that you enjoy with your friends,” Pine said.Before the extravaganza commenced, the cast and crew memorialized late “Trek” stars Leonard Nimoy and Anton Yelchin, who died June 19. Quinto reflected on original Spock actor Nimoy, while filmmaker J.J. Abrams led a moment of silence in honor of Yelchin, who plays navigator Pavel Chekov in the rebooted “Trek” movies.“There is something missing tonight,” Abrams said. “There is someone missing tonight.”“Trek,” which is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, will continue to have a massive presence at this week’s San Diego Comic-Con International. Several “Trek” sessions are planned inside the San Diego Convention Center, including a Saturday panel featuring actors from each “Trek” installment, such as William Shatner, Michael Dorn and Jeri Ryan.“It’s really a special moment in the series’ history with the new film, new comics and the new series coming to CBS All Access,” said Rod Roddenberry, the son of late “Trek” creator Gene Roddenberry.Comic-Con officially begins Thursday and continues through Sunday.Online:https://www.startrekmovie.comAP Entertainment Writer Ryan Pearson contributed to this report.Follow AP Entertainment Writer Derrik J. Lang on Twitter at https://www.twitter.com/derrikjlang . J.J. Abrams arrives at the world premiere of “Star Trek Beyond” at the Embarcadero Marina Park South on Wednesday, July 20, 2016, in San Diego. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP)center_img Chris Pine, from left, John Cho and Karl Urban arrive at the world premiere of “Star Trek Beyond” at the Embarcadero Marina Park South on Wednesday, July 20, 2016, in San Diego. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP)last_img read more

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The Moody Blooms: Dark florals move from runway to rooms

first_img This undated photo provided by The Shade Store shows one of their roller shade patterns. Deep hues add a layer of drama to these Desert Floral shades from The Shade Store; paired with crisp white walls, or a complementary wall color, they’d become art for the windows. (The Shade Store via AP) This undated photo provided by AllModern.com shows a creissant accent pillow. Polyester felt in rich fall hues like wine, kiwi, chocolate, violet and black help to create this rose-shaped pillow. (www.allmodern.com via AP) This undated photo provided by Anthropologie shows Liberty of London’s Feather Bloom floral print which graces a seating collection this season at Anthropologie. (Anthropologie via AP) In this undated photo provided by AllModern.com, Marcel Wanders’ textile print “Flower bits,” with an abstract of flowers and butterflies, enlivens the Nest pillow set for this Moooi’s sofa shown here.(www.allmodern.com via AP)center_img “These florals don’t hold back,” says designer Sara McArthur, formerly of Design Collective West and now principal of her eponymous firm in Highland, Utah.“They’re modern, cool and edgy. They’re romantic and rock ‘n’ roll at the same time,” she says. “Florals, typically a feminine pattern, are transformed into more androgynous looks with the darker palette.”Raun Thorp of the Los Angeles architectural firm Tichenor and Thorp says, “The most inspirational dark florals were in the (2017 Spring/Summer) Dries Van Noten runway show, by Azuma Makoto.” The Japanese floral designer encased dozens of exotic blooms in backlit blocks of ice to showcase the moody, ethereal floral prints on the clothes.“The fabrics in this collection would be a great starting point for a room’s palette,” says Thorp.Vivienne Westwood and Alexander McQueen have dark floral carpets and cushions for The Rug Company. Westwood’s oversize rose and magnolia motifs have a painterly vibe. McQueen has placed a macro photo of a crimson poppy on a midnight background; the rug becomes abstract art for the floor. (www.therugcompany.com )“Reminiscent of still-life art from Holland and Germany in the early 1600s, there’s a surge of new still-life floral wallpaper in 2017, echoing the moody baroque vibes of the Old World,” says McArthur.Flavor Paper worked with Manhattan floral studio Ovando and New York City’s Skot Yobauje Photography to create a digital-print paper called Elan Vital that’s atmospheric and hyper-realistic. Another pattern, Vivid Victorian, transforms a traditional floral print into something wild and dynamic as hotly hued blooms tumble on a sultry black damask background. (www.flavorpaper.com )Cole & Son, the British fine wallpaper manufacturer, carries several patterns drawn from the midcentury archives of Fornasetti, the Italian design house known for witty, fanciful takes on 20th century iconography. They include Peonie (with bouquets in copper, burgundy and lime or red, magenta and orange); Pansee (with the flat-faced flowers rendered in broody metallics); and Frutto Proibito (in which monkeys cavort among fig tree flora).“Who would think of Fornasetti for florals?” says Thorp. “They’re all done in dark and edgy color combinations that are more punk than prim.”Cynthia Rowley’s Bird Watching design for Tempaper pares down a chinoiserie bird-on-flowering-branch motif to a silhouette of molten gold on an inky background. (www.tempaperdesigns.com )Add some drama to windows with The Shade Store’s evocative Desert Flower pattern in one of four saturated hues, including deep orange, blue and black. (www.theshadestore.com )A modern version of Liberty of London’s rich Feather Bloom floral print graces a sofa, ottoman and swivel chair in a new collaboration at Anthropologie. (www.anthropologie.com )And from Italian decor atelier MIHO Unexpected Things, there’s a whimsical collection of easy-to-assemble little boxes and mountable fiberboard cupboards printed with patchwork florals. Shapes like hardcover books, beetles and fish add to the boxes’ eclectic charm; use them to stylishly stow keys, makeup (one comes with a handy mirror) or just as decor. (www.mihounexpectedshop.com ) We know that what brews in fashion percolates into decor. This fall, it’s floral prints loaded with depth and drama.Anna Sui’s fall 2017 show was replete with deep, moody florals on velvet, silk and chiffon. Recent collections from Dolce & Gabbana, Marc Jacobs and Miu Miu have also featured them.Now we’re seeing fall decor echoing the trend.last_img read more

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Felicity Huffman to plead guilty in admissions scam May 13

first_imgBOSTON | “Desperate Housewives” star Felicity Huffman will plead guilty on May 13 to charges that she took part in a sweeping college admissions cheating scam.Huffman had been scheduled to enter her plea in Boston federal court on May 21. A judge on Monday agreed to move up the hearing because the lead prosecutor will be out of town.The actress agreed earlier this month to plead guilty to conspiracy to commit mail fraud and honest services mail fraud. Authorities say she paid $15,000 to have someone correct the answers on her daughter’s SAT.Huffman was charged in March along with dozens of other prominent parents and coaches at elite universities. Prosecutors say other parents paid an admissions consultant to bribe coaches to get their children admitted as fake athletic recruits.last_img read more

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Review: ‘The Escape Room’ looks at the dark side of ambition

first_imgThis cover image released by St. Martin’s Press shows “The Escape Room,” a novel by Megan Goldin. (St. Martin’s Press via AP)“The Escape Room: a Novel” (St. Martin’s Press), by Megan GoldinTeam building exercises meant to foster cooperation, loyalty and critical thinking are often just an irritating waste of time that causes resentment, backbiting and gossip. At least that’s the experience of four investment bankers who work for the Wall Street firm of Stanhope and Sons in Megan Goldin’s claustrophobically tense debut, “The Escape Room,” which looks at the dark side of ambition when work is all-consuming.Vincent, Jules, Sylvie and Sam work long hours, sacrificing personal time and relationships for their jobs. They are committed to a “long, heady love affair with greed,” even if it kills them, and it’s fitting that the last names of these three men and one woman are seldom mentioned in the novel.Despite that “love affair,” they are perturbed at being summoned on a Friday night to a compulsory team-building session. They will participate in an escape-room challenge in a remote office high-rise building in the final stages of construction in the South Bronx. At best, they hate each other and are consumed by the stress of looming layoffs after losing two major accounts. They are plunged into darkness as the elevator zooms and stalls at the 70th floor, unable to be opened.As clues for an escape appear and disappear on the electronic board, each character’s ruthless personality and amorality take center stage. These are cruel people who are not above violence to achieve what they want. As the claustrophobic elevator becomes more intense, “The Escape Room” alternates to the story of Sara Hall, the firm’s brilliant new hire whose career didn’t end well and who hadn’t earned the others’ respect.“The Escape Room” works as the ultimate locked-room mystery. The darkness, except for the flashlights on dying cellphones, ramps up the suspense and the brutality. But, as one character says, “How much trouble could four investment bankers get into in a locked elevator?” As it turns out, plenty.Goldin excels at illustrating the pressures of a Wall Street career that includes an expensive lifestyle to keep up the illusion of success, deals made at strip clubs that reinforce the sexism in the industry and a general lack of trust. The oppressive elevator delivers a metaphor for their careers.last_img read more

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Scientists rethink Alzheimer’s, diversifying the drug search

first_img1 of 4 WASHINGTON  |  When researchers at the University of Kentucky compare brains donated from people who died with dementia, very rarely do they find one that bears only Alzheimer’s trademark plaques and tangles — no other damage.If they do, “we call it a unicorn,” said Donna Wilcock, an Alzheimer’s specialist at the university’s aging center. Contrary to popular perception, “there are a lot of changes that happen in the aging brain that lead to dementia in addition to plaques and tangles.”That hard-won lesson helps explain how scientists are rethinking Alzheimer’s.For years researchers have been guided by one leading theory — that getting rid of a buildup of a sticky protein called amyloid would ease the mind-robbing disease. Yet drug after drug has failed. They might clear out the gunk, but they’re not stopping Alzheimer’s inevitable worsening.The new mantra: diversify.With more money — the government had a record $2.4 billion to spend on Alzheimer’s research this year — the focus has shifted to exploring multiple novel ways of attacking a disease now considered too complex for a one-size-fits-all solution. On the list, researchers are targeting the brain’s specialized immune system, fighting inflammation, even asking if simmering infections play a role.Some even are looking beyond drugs, testing if electrical zaps in the brain, along a corridor of neural connections, might activate it in ways that slow Alzheimer’s damage. Tuesday, doctors at Barrow Neurological Institute in Phoenix announced they had implanted a pacemaker-like “deep brain stimulation” device into the first of more than 200 patients for an international study .Most of the fresh starts for drugs are in the earliest research stages. It’s far from clear that any will pan out, but “the field is now much more open-minded than it ever was to alternative ideas,” Wilcock said.BREAKING THE PLAQUE AND TANGLE LINKNo one knows what causes Alzheimer’s but amyloid deposits were an obvious first suspect, easy to spot when examining brain tissue. But it turns out that gunk starts silently building up 20 years before any memory loss, and by itself it’s not enough to cause degeneration.Sometime after plaques appear, another protein named tau starts forming tangles inside neurons, heralding cell death and memory loss.But again, not always: Autopsies show sometimes people die with large amounts of both plaques and tangles, yet escape dementia.So something else — maybe several other things — also must play a role. One possible culprit: The brain’s unique immune cells, called microglia (my-kroh-GLEE’-ah).No surprise if you’ve never heard of microglia. Neurons are the brain’s rock stars, the nerve cells that work together to transmit information like memories. Microglia are part of a different family of cells long regarded as the neurons’ support staff. But “it’s becoming clear they’re much more active and play a much more significant role,” said Dr. Richard Hodes, director of the National Institute on Aging.One microglial job is to gobble up toxic proteins and cellular debris. Recently, a mutation in a gene called TREM2 was found to weaken microglia and increase the risk of Alzheimer’s. Dr. David Holtzman at Washington University in St. Louis took a closer look — and says microglia may be key to how the amyloid-tau duo turns toxic.In donated human brains, his team found more tau tangles clustered around amyloid plaques when people harbored microglia-weakening TREM2 mutations. The researchers altered the TREM2 gene in mice and seeded their brains with a little human tau. Sure enough, more tangles formed next to plaques in mice with weak microglia than in those with functional immune cells, they recently reported in Nature Neuroscience.Why? Normal microglia seem to restrict amyloid plaques, which limits damage to surrounding tissue — damage that can make it easier for tau to take hold, he explained.While it was known that amyloid buildup drives tau tangles, “we never had a good clue as to how it is doing that,” Holtzman said. The new findings “would argue that these cells are sort of a missing link.”Separately, biotech company Alector Inc. has begun first-step patient testing of a drug designed to boost TREM2 and better activate microglia.THE GERM CONUNDRUMCould gum disease or herpes be to blame? The idea that infections earlier in life could set the stage for Alzheimer’s decades later has simmered on the edge of mainstream medicine, but it’s getting new attention. It sounds weird, but both the germ that causes gum disease and different strains of herpes viruses have been found in Alzheimer’s-affected brain tissue.Researchers in New York are testing the herpes drug valacyclovir in 130 people with mild Alzheimer’s who have evidence of infection with certain herpes strains.And Cortexyme Inc. is enrolling more than 500 early-stage patients around the country to test a drug that targets potentially neuron-damaging substances produced by gingivitis bacteria.Whether the germ theory is a worthwhile pursuit was hotly debated at an international Alzheimer’s Association meeting in July. One skeptic, Dr. Todd Golde of the University of Florida, cautioned that germs’ mere presence doesn’t mean they caused dementia — they could be a consequence of it.Still, a 2018 study from Taiwan offered a hint that treating herpes infection might lower later dementia risk. And a U.S. study found certain herpes viruses affected the behavior of Alzheimer’s-related genes.“Maybe these are just opportunistic pathogens that have space to spring up in the brains of people affected with Alzheimer’s disease,” said Benjamin Readhead of Arizona State University, who co-authored that U.S. paper. But, “it looks at least plausible that some of these pathogens are capable of acting as accelerants of disease.”A COMMON DENOMINATOROne key commonality among emerging Alzheimer’s theories is how aggressively the brain’s immune system defends itself — and thus how inflamed it becomes.Inflammation is a normal part of the body’s response to illness and injury, one method of fighting infection or healing wounds. But when inflammation is too strong, or doesn’t go away, it’s like friendly fire that harms cells. Remember how some people have lots of plaques and tangles but no dementia? A few years ago Massachusetts General researchers found strikingly little inflammation surrounded all the gunky buildup in the resilient brains — but the Alzheimer’s-affected brains harbored a lot.Research since has found similar inflammatory effects with other forms of dementia — like vascular dementia, where tiny blood vessels that feed the brain are lost or blocked, and dementias caused by Lewy bodies or other toxic proteins. A growing list of genes linked to inflammatory processes also may play a role.A handful of drugs are being explored in the quest to tamp down inflammation’s damaging side without quashing its good effects. Take those microglia, which Holtzman said “may be a two-edged sword.”Early on, before there’s too much plaque, revving them up may be good. But later on, a hyperactive swarm around growing plaques spews out inflammatory molecules.In addition to their immune system job, microglia also secrete molecules that help nourish neurons, noted Kentucky’s Wilcock. The goal is to restore the natural balance of a healthy brain’s environment, she said, so microglia “can perform their essential functions without damaging surrounding tissue.”AMYLOID’S STILL IN THE PICTUREAll those drug flops weren’t a waste of time.“Every time there’s a failure it’s absolutely clear that we learn a lot,” Emory University neurologist Dr. Allan Levey recently told the government’s Alzheimer’s advisory council.One lesson: Timing may matter. Most of the failed anti-amyloid drugs were tested in people who already had at least mild symptoms. Some studies seeking to prevent memory loss in the first place still are underway. Several anti-tau drugs also are being tested.Another lesson: Most people have a mix of different dementias, which means they’ll need a variety of treatments.“Now we have an opportunity, a real opportunity, to expand and try all these avenues,” said Alzheimer’s Association chief science officer Maria Carrillo. “The triggers as we understand them are broad.”___AP Chief Medical Writer Marilynn Marchione contributed to this report.___The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content This Aug. 14, 2019 photo provided by the University of Kentucky shows brain samples in storage at the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging in Lexington, Ky. Once a month, researchers at the University of Kentucky gather to compare donated brains from people who died with dementia. Very rarely do they find one that bears only Alzheimer’s trademark plaques and tangles, no other damage. (Mark Cornelison/University of Kentucky via AP) In this Aug. 14, 2019 photo provided by the University of Kentucky, Donna Wilcock, of the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, holds a brain in her lab in Lexington, Ky. She says that contrary to popular perception, “there are a lot of changes that happen in the aging brain that lead to dementia in addition to plaques and tangles.” (Mark Cornelison/University of Kentucky via AP)center_img This Aug. 14, 2019 photo provided by the University of Kentucky shows brain samples in storage at the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging in Lexington, Ky. Once a month, researchers at the University of Kentucky gather to compare donated brains from people who died with dementia. Very rarely do they find one that bears only Alzheimer’s trademark plaques and tangles, no other damage. (Mark Cornelison/University of Kentucky via AP) This Aug. 14, 2019 photo provided by the University of Kentucky shows Donna Wilcock, of the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging in her lab in Lexington, Ky. She says that contrary to popular perception, “there are a lot of changes that happen in the aging brain that lead to dementia in addition to plaques and tangles.” (Mark Cornelison/University of Kentucky via AP)last_img read more

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Review: ‘The Laundromat’ is a messy and derivative flick

first_imgThis image released by Netflix shows Meryl Streep in a scene from “The Laundromat,” in theaters on Sept. 27. (Claudette Barius/Netflix via AP)Hollywood often has a fraught time trying to depict Wall Street venality. It’s understandable: Complex financial securities don’t easily translate to film.Sometimes it’s done well, like when Gordon Gekko explained hostile takeovers over lunch in “Wall Street” or Margot Robbie preposterously expounded on subprime mortgages from a bubble bath in “The Big Short.”But sometimes Hollywood makes a hash of it and the latest director to get caught overreaching is Steven Soderbergh. His film “The Laundromat ” is as opaque, disjointed and unwise as a credit default swap.Soderbergh has reteamed with screenwriter Scott Burns to try to illustrate how the world’s richest people hide their money from the tax man, inspired by the revelations in the leaked Panama Papers, a massive trove of 11.5 million documents.The papers — including thousands of shell company networks and tax havens — came from the database of the world’s fourth biggest offshore law firm, Mossack Fonseca. There are many ways to humanize this trove, but the filmmakers have decided that large doses of farce will suffice. It does not.They also decided that several interconnected stories would be best, making it a sort of “Love Actually” for the financial set. So we go from a boat tragedy in upstate New York to a fabulously rich but manipulative African-born businessman in Los Angeles to some high-stakes corruption in China. Despite 2.6 terabytes of data from the Panama Papers, the filmmakers have fictionalized most of the characters and none seem real at all. “Think of them as fairy tales that actually happened,” we are told.Soderbergh has squandered a lot of acting talent, including from Jeffrey Wright, David Schwimmer, Will Forte, Chris Parnell, Larry Wilmore, Nikki Amuka-Bird, Rosalind Chao, James Cromwell and Sharon Stone. We get not just one but two Meryl Streep roles — and it’s still a dud.Soderbergh mixes dread, sorrow and mass deaths with comedic sections and a jazzy score. There are images of organ harvesting, a fantasy gun rampage, gangland hits, vomiting, a freak death and plenty of fourth wall breaking. He both meanders and leans into quick editing cuts. He’s trying to keep the viewer off-kilter and confused — just like Wall Street likes it. But the tonal shifts are painful and none of the chapters are long enough to engage viewers. Worst, no new ground is broken here. It’s a film — to borrow a financial term — that’s derivative.The connecting tissue between the different stories are the characters of Mossack and Fonseca, the lawyers accused of being money launderers. They’re played — very much over the top — by Antonio Banderas and Gary Oldman, our ever-present guides to this world of financial sordidness.Often dressed in tuxes and sipping martinis, Mossack and Fonseca archly explain where they came from, how money works and how high finance bends to the whims of the superrich. Instead of villains, they are Eurotrashy bon vivants. Muddying the waters, Oldman and Banderas also portray the real tux-less Mossack and Fonseca as a pair of cold board room managers whose work is upended.Streep gets the most screen time as a sort of avenging blue-collar heroine trying to uncover the Mossack and Fonseca shenanigans. “Somebody has to sound the alarm,” she says. But her story sort of peters out as we flash to other chapters. “The Laundromat” might have worked better if it was more like a Streep-led “Erin Brockovich” than the anthology “Traffic,” but Soderbergh has one last trick up his sleeve with Streep right at the end and a lesson about illusion. Alas, by then, you will have lost interest.The director ends on a righteous note but he’s not earned it. He has so humanized his villains that we may feel sorry for them instead of resting the blame for every school without books or municipal bridge that’s collapsed at their feet. We are told the biggest tax haven in the world is the United States and urged to do something about it. But Soderbergh admits he’s taken advantage of the system, too — he admits to using several shell companies in Delaware. Like the film he made, the director is compromised.“The Laundromat,” a Netflix release, is rated R for language and adult situations. Running time: 93 minutes. One star out of four.MPAA definition of R: Restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.Online: https://www.netflix.com/title/80994011Mark Kennedy is at http://twitter.com/KennedyTwitslast_img read more

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RIGHT AT HOME: It’s that ’70s (and ’80s) show in home…

first_imgYou’ve probably noticed it in clothing stores: racks and shelves full of high-waisted flares, rib-knit turtlenecks, acid green sweatshirts and disco ball metallics. It’s that ’70s — and ’80s — show.These two fashion trends have, as usual, worked their way into home decor as well.“Right now, in home design, it feels like a total ’70s takeover,” says Apartment Therapy’s Danielle Blundell. “This time period had two pretty distinct things going on — boho hippie vibes and glam, glitzy disco feels. Which means you can probably find a way to work something ’70s into your home no matter your aesthetic.”Watch for patchwork and peasant prints, fringe and earthy hues. Shaggy, textured woven rugs. Modernist wall art. Rattan etageres and side tables.One of the hallmarks of the 1980s was Memphis style. Started by Austrian-born but Italian-raised architect Ettore Sottsass, it was characterized by squiggle and geometric pattern, mixing of pastels with black and brights, and an overall playful, whimsical approach. Sottsass and his team designed for Fiorucci, Alessi and Esprit among others, and Karl Lagerfeld and Bowie were collectors.Designer Sasha Bikoff created a buzz-worthy Memphis-inspired staircase for the 2018 Kips Bay Decorator Showhouse in Manhattan. New Yorker Raquel Cayre manages an Instagram account dedicated to all things Sottsass, and even created a temporary space in Soho called Raquel’s Dream House, chock full of Memphis themed interior décor.Memphis originals are pricey, but you can find referential decorative items that are affordable. Street brand Supreme offers clothing and skateboard decks; designer Ellen Van Dusen’s Brooklyn-based eponymous company makes clothing and home goods featuring her own versions of Memphis pattern.SurfacesImola Ceramica has the Pop collection of ceramic tile, with Roy Lichtenstein-inspired art comics printed on subway-style tile. Their Let It Bee collection features groovy, semi-circular, tone-on-tone designs in brick red, indigo, apple green and dark yellow.Designer/architect Luca Andrisani has designed a collection for New York Cement Tile called Geometrika. Inspired by midcentury op art, there are retro hues, square and rectangular shapes, and eye-catching optical illusion patterns. . Walker Zanger has Australian designer Pietta Donovan’s hip new ’70s-patterned tile collection.At www.spoonflower.com you’ll find several peel and stick wallpapers and fabric by the yard with Memphis style or leopard prints. Here as well are ’70s-style florals in wallcoverings and fabric.European bathware designers have been featuring pedestal sinks, toilets and tubs in colors like cranberry, moss, mustard, teal and pink — colors that would have been destined for the bin a few years ago. Here in North America, eBay and salvage sites like Retro Renovation are good places to source vintage wares. For new products, Aquatica USA has roomy resin tubs in dark red or moss green with white interior, while Bella Stone’s got a fun one in fire-engine red.AccessoriesCheck out www.roostery.com for whimsical ’70s-style fruit and vegetable prints, geometrics and paisleys in soft goods like napery and throw pillows.Sometimes it’s the little things that bring the look home. Atomic starburst knobs, for example; and www.zazzle.com has several patterns. Cabinet and doorknob backplates come in starry shapes at www.rejuvenation.com.At www.dusendusen.com, find soft furnishings printed with bold check, dot, stripe, cutout and squiggle patterns. There are patterned pet beds, pillows and shower curtains, too.FurnitureIn a collaboration with London-based Soho Home, Anthropologie offers the Adriana chair; in a deep terracotta velvet, the chubby, channel-seamed silhouette echoes Italian postmodern design. Kardiel’s curvy Miranda gold-velvet two-seater has an Austin Powers flair.At Beam, you’ll find simple yet stylish chairs and tables made of powder-coated steel, hardwood and performance fabrics, part of a collaboration between Gus(asterisk)Modern and LUUM inspired by the Memphis Group’s color palette.ModShop has a treasure trove of options, including the Chubby 2 lounge chair that swivels on a brass-clad base, and the St. Germain side table and credenza, with an abstract, patterned front in poppy colors, perched on chunky acrylic legs.Ball-shaped and half-dome lighting in matte and polished metallics reference the ’70s, as do embossed ceramic bases and cane and rattan fixtures. Look for combinations of pyramids, squares and balls, as well as thick glass circle shapes in ’80s-style fixtures. CB2, Urban Outfitters and All Modern have well-priced designs, while Chairish and 1stDibs are good places to hunt for vintage pieces. This undated photo shows Anthropologie’s Adriana velvet chair. The chair, in a 70s-era rust hue, is a comfy, cushy nod to the groovy décor trend. (Anthropologie via AP) This undated photo provided by Beam shows the Gus* X LUUM Halifax Chair. Gus*Modern and LUUM collaborated on a collection of powder-coated steel, hardwood and performance-fabric upholstered chairs and side tables inspired by playful, colorful vibe of Memphis design. (Beam via AP) This undated photo provided by Walker Zanger shows tile by Australian designer Pietta Donovan, who has created a hip collection of cement tile inspired by the kaleidoscopic shapes, curvy profiles and distinct colorways of 70s wallpaper. (Walker Zanger via AP) This undated photo shows the staircase inside the Kips Bay Showhouse in New York. New York-based designer Sasha Bikoff created the exuberant showstopper of a staircase for 2018’s Kip’s Bay Showhouse in Manhattan. Using Memphis Milano designers Ettore Sottsass and Alessandro Mendinii as her inspiration, the space was filled with brights and pastels, mirrors, and a riot of pattern. The designer encourages home decorators to “be fearless,” and that confident, positive attitude is at the heart of the 70s/80s décor trend.(Genevieve Garrupo/Sasha Bikoff via AP) This undated photo shows a selection from Imola Ceramica’s Let It Bee tile collection, which features half moon and circle patterns in vibrant midcentury colors, reflecting the swingy artistic flair of the era. (Ceramics of Italy via AP) 1 of 5last_img read more

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CNN’s Cuomo, with coronavirus, completes show from basement

first_imgFILE – This May 15, 2019 file photo shows CNN news anchor Chris Cuomo at the WarnerMedia Upfront in New York. Cuomo has announced that he has tested positive for the coronavirus. The prime-time host is one of the most visible media figures to come down with the disease. He said he’s experienced chills, fever and shortness of breath. He promised to continue doing his show while in quarantine in the basement of his home. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File)NEW YORK  |  A bleary-eyed Chris Cuomo, saying he wanted to be a cautionary tale for his audience, anchored his CNN show from his basement Tuesday after testing positive for the coronavirus.Via remote link, he interviewed Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker, an emergency room nurse and CNN medical correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta, who expressed worry about one of Cuomo’s symptoms.“Brace yourself,” Cuomo told viewers, “not for a hoax. But for the next few weeks of scary and painful realities. This is a fight. It’s going to get worse. We’re going to suffer.”Cuomo looked pale, his eyes watery and red-rimmed. He took a few deep breaths to compose himself. He repeated himself. Even Gupta said he didn’t look good, and said he’d call later to talk about a tightness Cuomo was feeling in his chest.The 49-year-old newsman, whose brother, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, has logged just as much television airtime lately with daily briefings on how the disease is affecting his state, said earlier that he knew it was a matter of time because of how often he was exposed to people. He said he’s staying in the basement of his Long Island home to protect himself from his wife and children.The New York governor, who appeared with his brother on CNN by remote link the night before, also used the personal story to warn others during his press briefing Tuesday. He noted that he had scolded Chris for having their 88-year-old mother, Matilda, visiting Chris’ home two weeks ago.“It’s my family, it’s your family, it’s all of our families,” he said. “This virus is so insidious, and we have to keep that in mind.”Chris Cuomo said he thought his mom would be safer at his house than in her New York City apartment, but his brother persuaded him to have her stay at his sister’s place in Westchester County.Some competitors, including Sean Hannity and Geraldo Rivera of Fox News Channel, and Joy Reid and Ali Velshi of MSNBC, sent best wishes to Cuomo through social media Tuesday.He said he appreciated the sympathy from well-wishers but tried to deflect it.“Hopefully, I’ll be able to keep doing the show,” he said. “But who knows?”One of the most unsettling things about the disease, he said, is hearing from doctors that there really isn’t much he can do now except “suck it up.”“The best medicine is not to get it — prevention,” he said in a pre-show discussion with colleague Anderson Cooper.Most people who get the virus have mild to moderate symptoms and recover. But for older people, and those with underlying medical conditions, the disease can be dangerous. More than 3,000 people have died in the U.S. alone.Andrew Cuomo, 62, and the CNN anchor are sons of the late New York Gov. Mario Cuomo, and that teasing big brother-little brother dynamic often enlivens their appearances together. The governor called him his best friend.“He is going to be fine,” he said. “He’s young, in good shape, strong — not as strong as he thinks he is, but he will be fine.”Chris got a measure of revenge Tuesday night, referring to his brother as “Captain Banana Hands.”last_img read more

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FDA approves pill for aggressive breast cancer that’s spread

first_imgThis photo provided by Seattle Genetics Inc., shows the breast cancer drug Tukysa, developed by Seattle Genetics. U.S. regulators on Thursday, April 14, 2020, approved the new drug for an aggressive type of breast cancer that’s spread in the body, including into the brain, where it’s especially tough to treat. (Seattle Genetics via AP)U.S. regulators on Friday approved a new drug for an aggressive type of breast cancer that’s spread in the body — including into the brain, where it’s especially tough to treat.The Food and Drug Administration said Tukysa, a twice-daily pill developed by Seattle Genetics, is for people with what’s known as HER2-positive breast cancer that has spread and resisted multiple other medicines. This type of cancer is driven by an overactive gene that makes too much of the HER2 protein, which promotes cancer growth.Each year, about 50,000 people in the U.S. are diagnosed with HER2-positive breast cancer. It’s usually curable, but when it spreads it kills most patients. In up to half of them, the cancer reaches the brain, giving that group such a poor prognosis that they have rarely been included in tests of new drugs.Tukysa, pronounced too-KYE’-sah and also known as tucatinib, works by attacking cancer cells from inside and outside to block production of the HER2 protein.“This is basically taking the ammunition out of that weapon,” said Dr. Eric Winer, a Dana-Farber Cancer Institute researcher who helped lead the key patient study and consults for Seattle Genetics and other drugmakers.In that company-funded study, half the 612 participants got Tukysa along with standard cancer drugs Herceptin and Xeloda. The other half got the two standard drugs and a dummy pill.In the group getting Tukysa, 45% survived at least two years, compared with 27% in the placebo group. Among the participants whose cancer spread to the brain, 25% were alive after a year versus none in the placebo group.“It’s a significant advance,” said Winer.Common side effects included diarrhea, fatigue, vomiting and liver function changes.Tukysa has a list price of $18,500 per month, or roughly $111,000 for an average course of treatment, without insurance. Most patients don’t pay that, and Seattle Genetics plans to offer financial aid.Tukysa should be available almost immediately.Follow Linda A. Johnson at https://twitter.com/LindaJ_onPharmaThe Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.last_img read more

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